TALLY ROOM PROCEDURES

 

The purposes of the Tally Room are:

  1. Tabulation of dancers' scores
  2. Application of the Scoring System Rules to select a winner
  3. Scrutiny of relative placements to assure fair judging
  4. Determination and removal of biased scores
  5. Reapplication of the Scoring System Rules if a judge or judges scores are removed

Overseer and Club Representatives
The Overseer and Club Representatives must be certified in Tally Room Procedures and Scoring System Rules.

Overseer
The host club should provide the overseer. The Overseer is the person that watches the judges to make sure that they are doing their duty, and may recommend that a judge's scores be eliminated for misconduct (i.e., not paying attention to the dancers, talking, etc.). The Overseer watches the judges, collects the scores, and oversees the final tabulation of the scores in the Tally Room.

Club Representative
Each club in the association may participate in the Tally Room process by providing a certified Club Representative. The club may provide a Club Representative even if they do not have any dancers in the contest. A club is allowed to have different Club Representatives for the various contests. However, the Club Representative must not have danced or judged in the contest that they are representing. This specifically allows Club Representatives to dance in other contests or to judge other contests as long as it is not the contest in which they are serving as Club Representative.

Collection and Tabulation of Scores
The judges will use "single sheet" scoring. It is up to the host club to determine the form and method of "single sheet" scoring.

Immediately after the last couple has danced, the Overseer will collect all score sheets from the judges. The Club Representatives and the Overseer will then proceed to the Tally Room for final tabulation. The scores must be evaluated after each contest.

Tally Room Equipment
The Tally Room should be provided with the following:

  1. A complete and up-to-date set of Judging Guidelines, Tally Room Procedures, and Scoring System Rules.
  2. A complete list of the Board of Representatives members assigned to the contest.
  3. A computer, printer, and software programmed to apply the Scoring System Rules.

Referee Judge's Scores
The Referee Judge's scores will not be revealed to any of the Club Representatives until they are needed to either break a tie in the final results or to replace the scores of an Overall Performance Judge. It is acceptable to enter the Referee Judge's scores into the computer. They must not be used in any other matters. For example, do not use the Referee Judge's scores to see what would happen if an Overall Performance Judge's scores were eliminated.

Scrutiny of Relative Placements
The Overseer and Club Representatives will scrutinize the relative placements as to favoritism or prejudice by the trend of the other judges and by club affiliation. The Overseer and Club Representatives will look for:

  1. Judging a couple from his/her club higher than the trend of the other judges.
  2. Judging a couple from his/her club lower than the trend of the other judges.
  3. Judging any couple lower than the trend of the other judges.
  4. Judging any couple higher than the trend of the other judges.
  5. Predetermined opinions at the onset of the contest.
  6. Any Judge's score that is statistically outside the expected range of scores, given the standard deviation of the contest at hand.
    This information will be available only if computerized methods are used to apply the Scoring System Rules.

The following information is an explanation provided by Terry Rippa with respect to Tally Room Procedures. This information is not part of the procedures, but is a subjective part of the process.

[Any scores outside of two standard deviations is flagged (highlighted).

A contest with contestants and judges from many different areas of the country usually increases the standard deviation, as opposed to a more local or regional contest, because styles and opinions vary more.

For example, if in the contest at hand, the computer calculates that the standard deviation is 1.5, two standard deviations would be three. If Judge D gave Couple #3-6th place and their placement was 2nd, the judge was 4 placements off, one more than the two standard deviations of three. This placement (6th) would be flagged. If Judge D gave Couple #5-1st place and their placement was 6th, the judge was 5 placements off, two more than the two standard deviations of three. This placement (1st) would also be flagged and the judge's scores scrutinized.

If a judge has two flags in any given contest, particularly in the trophy/money placements, their scores are likely to be removed (thrown out).

To facilitate easy scrutiny, the "away place" are printed underneath the actual judge's placements on the complete printout of placements. In the example above, underneath placement "6" (Judge D, Couple #3) would be a 4; underneath placement "1" (Judge D, Couple #5) would be a 5. Knowing the numerical value of twice the standard deviation, it is easy to spot "away places" greater than 3.

Another aspect to be considered is whether or not a judge's flag was in the trophy/money placements. If there are 15 contestants but only 5 winning placements and a judge is flagged for a placement outside of roughly 8 placements (ie, the judge placed a couple 10th and they got
15th and his score was flagged), consideration should be given to its relavancy to the top placements.

Terry Rippa]

 

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